mci

Mild Cognitive Impairment

Sheila Solis

Autopsy Program Coordinator

Sheila graduated with honors in psychology from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 2013. During her undergraduate studies, she became involved in social psychology and cognitive psychology research labs, held an internship in a mental health setting, was on a student health advisory committee for the Executive Vice-Chancellor of UC Santa Cruz, and studied neuroscience at the University of Cambridge (UK). Prior to joining the team at UCSF, Sheila worked as a mental health professional in contract with the Santa Cruz County Adult Mental Health Services. Sheila looks forward to combining her rich experience in research and supportive services by working with individuals and families in the autopsy program.

Publications

A selection of the abstracts and manuscripts published using EXAMINER data.

The publications listed on this page are a selection of the articles published that used the EXAMINER battery. If you wish to look for more, you can search PubMED, which is maintained by the National Library of Medicine, or Google Scholar.

Manuscripts

  1. Kramer, J.H. (2014). Special Series Introduction: NIH EXAMINER and the Assessment of Executive Functioning. Journal of the International Psychological Society, 20(1), 8-10. doi: 10.1017/S1355617713001185

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Read through our list of commonly asked questions about using the NIH EXAMINER Test Battery.


Forms and Manual

Q: Where do I get the latest manual and forms?
A: Here. The links are

Anesthesia

The risk of cognitive decline related to surgery and anesthesia continues to be debated in the scientific literature. Some animal studies suggest that anesthesia may worsen the development of the plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease while others identify the surgical procedure itself to be a problem by causing inflammation and release of harmful proteins. Others attribute temporary or permanent cognitive changes to the medications used to manage pain or other complications of being hospitalized. Ultimately, although this is a very active area of research, there are no definitive studies in older humans that prove a causative effect on the brain from anesthesia or provide recommendations on specific choices of anesthesia. Despite this, we hope to be able to identify information that may help our patients with cognitive problems evaluate the risk and make informed choices about surgery and anesthesia.

The risk of cognitive decline related to surgery and anesthesia continues to be debated in the scientific literature. Some animal studies suggest that anesthesia may worsen the development of the plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease while others identify the surgical procedure itself to be a problem by causing inflammation and release of harmful proteins. Others attribute temporary or permanent cognitive changes to the medications used to manage pain or other complications of being hospitalized.

Brian Yang

Research Coordinator

Brian was born and raised in Ann Arbor, Michigan before graduating from Harvard University in 2013 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in neurobiology. At Harvard, Brian worked under the guidance of Dr. Randy Buckner at the Cognitive Neuroscience Lab in the Harvard Center for Brain Science. His research utilized functional neuroimaging techniques to investigate working memory and sensory perception. Joining the Memory and Aging Center in June 2013, Brian coordinates a longitudinal study assessing the clinical relationships of compromised eye movement control (Saccade & Aging). He is planning to eventually pursue a career in medicine.

Serggio Lanata, MD

Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Dr. Serggio Lanata was raised in Peru, where he began his undergraduate studies in general science. He later earned a bachelor of science degree from the University of Florida. He obtained his medical degree from the University of South Florida, and then completed his medicine internship and neurology residency at Brown University. He joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in July 2013 as a Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow. He evaluates and treats patients referred to the MAC clinic.

Currently, he is mostly interested in the phenotypic overlap that exists between behavioral variant FTD and different psychiatric disorders, and how our understanding of bvFTD can inform our knowledge of the pathophysiology that underlies specific psychiatric disorders.

Salvatore Spina, MD, PhD

Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Dr. Spina received his medical degree from the University of Catania, Italy. He completed a neurology residency at the University of Siena, Italy from which he also obtained his doctorate degree on mechanisms of neurodegeneration. He was trained in neuropathology of dementia syndromes at the Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, Indianapolis in the laboratory of Dr. Bernardino Ghetti. Later, he completed an internship in internal medicine and a neurology residency at Indiana University. Dr. Spina’s research focuses on the clinicopathologic and genetic correlations in neurodegenerative dementia syndromes, with a special interest on frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

Richard Tsai, MD

Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Dr. Richard Tsai received his undergraduate degree in molecular and cell biology at University of California, Berkeley and a joint MD/MBA degree at Drexel University. He completed a neurology residency at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, serving as chief resident in his last year. During his residency Dr. Tsai studied dementia and elderly populations in the developing world and worked on white matter imaging of dual task gait performance.

Dr. Tsai is fluent in English and Mandarin Chinese. In addition to evaluating patients at the Memory and Aging Center, he sees patients at the Chinese Hospital and SFDPH Chinatown Public Health Center in Chinatown.

Peter Pressman, MD

Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Dr. Pressman received a BA degree in biology and English from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. He then spent three years as a research assistant at Oregon Health & Science University’s Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Center under Dr. Jeffrey Kaye. Dr. Pressman went on to receive his MD from Oregon Health & Science University, then moved to Chicago, Illinois where he completed an internship in internal medicine and residency in neurology through Northwestern University. Dr. Pressman joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2011 as a Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow.

Dr. Pressman is particularly interested in communication, emotion, and sensorimotor integration in neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal dementia, early onset Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. He has been awarded a Clinical Research Training Fellowship by the American Brain Foundation to pursue research on the melody of speech in neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Pressman is also a freelance writer whose work can be read on neurology.about.com.

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