hd

Huntington's Disease

Christie Yeung

Research Coordinator

Christie grew up in San Francisco Bay Area and graduated from San Francisco State University in 2010 with a bachelor of science degree in apparel design and merchandising with a minor in marketing. While attending school, she became interested in gerontology and worked as a research associate at UCSF in the Department of Geriatrics under Principal Investigator Alexander Smith, MD, MPH. It was then that she put her native language, Cantonese, to use as she studied and interviewed participants for multiple studies which included the publishing of the journal article ”Perceptions of Successful Aging Among Diverse Elders with Late-Life Disability."

Outside of her career life, you will find Christie reading her favorite magazines at local coffee shops, hiking, and attending art & wine festivals. Christie joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in October 2014 working under Dr. Howie Rosen. She is a research coordinator for the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) and the Care Ecosystem study.

Care Ecosystem: Navigating Patients and Families through Stages of Care

Most dementia care today is crisis-oriented, intermittent and impersonal. The Care Ecosystem is a proactive model that emphasizes coordinated, continuous, and personalized care and aims to improve health and satisfaction for patients and their caregivers. The intervention will also try to reduce avoidable emergency room visits and hospitalizations, and delay entry into a nursing home.

 

Enrolling now! (click to see if you qualify)

Gabe Marx

Assistant Clinical Research Coordinator

Gabe grew up in the Bay Area before heading to Ohio to study neuroscience at Oberlin College, graduating in 2014. During his summers, Gabe garnered research experience by working in various neuroscience labs such as Dr. Sofia Vinogradov’s lab at the San Francisco VA researching cognitive training as a therapy for sensory deficits in schizophrenia as well as Dr. Rene Hen’s lab at Columbia University investigating hippocampal neurogenesis in rodent models. Gabe first began his work in neuroimaging while studying abroad in Budapest, Hungary. While working at the Budapest Center for Complex Systems and Computational Neuroscience, Gabe worked on advanced techniques in connectivity analysis of functional MRI data. This work was continued back at Oberlin with his advisor, Dr. Patrick Simen. There, Gabe investigated networks activated in two-point decision making paradigms through fMRI data.

Gabe joined the Memory and Aging Center in September 2014. He is an imaging core analyst and clinical research coordinator for Dr. Rosen’s Neuroimaging in Frontotemporal Dementia study—a longitudinal study aimed at determining which imaging modalities and biomarkers help predict the onset and monitor the progression of frontotemporal dementia.

Gabe currently lives in Oakland. In his free time, Gabe is an active musician and songwriter.

Gallery 190

The Memory and Aging Center has met individuals who never created art before becoming ill and are now making wonderful, intriguing artwork in the face of their illness. When the MAC moved to the UCSF Mission Bay Campus in 2012, we immediately imagined art hanging in the beautiful reception area of Suite 190.

Gallery 190, sponsored by the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC), is located in the Sandler Neurosciences Building on the Mission Bay Campus of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Luke Bonham

Research Coordinator

Luke grew up in Southern California before attending UC Berkeley. Graduating with a degree in business administration, he joined the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center in 2013. Prior to joining the Memory and Aging Center, he worked in Dr. Dena Dubal’s lab at UCSF to study sex differences in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. He currently works with Jennifer Yokoyama, PhD, and Howard Rosen, MD, to study the genetics of healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

In his free time, Luke likes to ski, camp and hike.

Fitness, Aging & Stress (FAST) Study for Family Caregivers

The purpose of this study is to explore the benefits of regular physical activity to adult women and men providing care to family members who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

Summary

Joanna Hellmuth, MD, MHS

Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Joanna Hellmuth, MD, MHS, joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in July 2014 as a behavioral neurology fellow. She provides care to patients with various neurodegenerative disorders and collaborates in the evaluation of patients for the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) and frontotemporal dementia program project grant.

Lisa Kritikos

Research Coordinator

Lisa Kritikos joined the Memory and Aging Center in 2014. Her primary role is managing the New Approaches to Dementia Heterogeneity research, which follows patients with the goal of learning more about dementia to improve early detection and clinical care for patients as part of the UCSF Alzheimer's Disease Research Center.

Natanya Russek

Research Coordinator

Natanya Russek graduated from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 2014 with a degree in neurobiology. At Wisconsin she contributed to research on the development of a stem cell therapy for stroke under the guidance of Dr. Matthew Jensen.

Natanya joined the Memory and Aging Center in May of 2014. She coordinates the study Frontotemporal Dementia: Genes, Imaging and Emotions. This observational study aims to better characterize neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal dementia with the goal of developing better diagnostic tools for the diseases.

Carolyn Fredericks, MD

Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Carolyn Fredericks, MD, joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in July 2014 as a behavioral neurology fellow. She completed her bachelor's degrees at Brown University in classics and neuroscience, then received her medical degree from Stanford University, where she also completed her internship in internal medicine. She went on to a residency in neurology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and UCSF. Her prior research experience includes studies of genetic influences on corticolimbic circuits in individuals with bipolar disorder, functional neuroimaging studies of reward processing in both healthy and bipolar individuals, and exploration of the inflammatory response to psychosocial stress in healthy young women. She is currently working with Drs. Bill Seeley and Virginia Sturm in an effort to better understand the effects of genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease on psychosocial measures and intrinsic brain connectivity.

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