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Contact Us

For more information about the Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank (NDBB) and its tissue sharing procedure, please contact the administrative manager. For questions about the Autopsy Program, please contact the autopsy coordinator.

For more information about the Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank (NDBB) and its tissue sharing procedure, please contact the administrative manager at 415-502-7459.

For questions about the Autopsy Program, please contact the autopsy coordinator at 415-476-1681 or autopsy@memory.ucsf.edu.

Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank (NDBB) Director
William Seeley, MD
Associate Professor of Neurology
UCSF Memory and Aging Center
415-476-2793
wseeley@memory.ucsf.edu

Brain Donation

Brain donation provides individuals the opportunity to help others affected by dementia by advancing our scientific understanding of neurodegenerative diseases and healthy aging. We honor the gift of donation and treat donors, their bereaved families, and all tissue with care and respect.

Why donate?

Brain donation provides individuals the opportunity to help others affected by dementia by advancing our scientific understanding of neurodegenerative diseases and healthy aging. We honor the gift of donation and treat donors, their bereaved families, and all tissue with care and respect.

Examining the brain after death is currently the only way to obtain a definitive diagnosis of the underlying causes of dementia. A diagnosis of absolute certainty cannot be made by clinical evaluation alone.

Prion Resource Sharing

The Memory and Aging Center encourages and facilitates research and publications by current and new investigators. We are eager to help generate successful proposals, secure funding and publish study results. Resources are provided solely for use in academic, not-for-profit research at recognized educational institutions.

Academic, not-for-profit investigators can request the following resources from the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC):

  • Subjects for research studies
  • Archived data
  • Imaging data
  • Tissue specimens
  • Video clips of behaviors

For details, please see our Resource Sharing page.

Prion Research Meetings

Scientific and medical meetings provide a forum for new ideas in research or treatment to be presented to colleagues and discussed. There are several meetings focused on prion disease.

Lorne Conference on Protein Structure and Function

  • February 8–12, 2015
  • Mantra Lorne, Victoria, Australia

Recent Publications About Prion Disease

To read scientific abstracts and articles, please search PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health or browse our selected list of articles about prion disease.

PubMed is a service of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. It comprises more than 22 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Selected Articles Related to Prion Disease

Laboratory Prion Research

The Memory and Aging Center clinical team collaborates closely with several research laboratories at UCSF to quickly convert laboratory discoveries about human prion disease into novel treatments.

The Prusiner Laboratory

Dr. Stanley B. Prusiner discovered prions, for which he won the Nobel Prize in 1997, and is currently Director of the Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Professor of Neurology and Biochemistry at the University of California, San Francisco. He is the editor of 12 books and over 350 research articles.

Clinical Prion Research

Currently the UCSF Memory and Aging Center is running two clinical research studies that enroll people with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. One aims to improve the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of rapidly progressive dementias – including CJD, while the other looks more broadly at several clinical syndromes that can lead to dementia.

Early Diagnosis of Human Prion Disease

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