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Video

Health care educators can request video clips of behavior from the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) to use for professional education. These clips have been reviewed and characterized by the neurologists in our team, and the patients have consented to allow the clips to be used for educational purposes. Prior to submitting your request, please consult with the Clinical Core leader, Dr. Joel Kramer or Rosalie Gearhart at (415) 476-5570.

Subject Identity

Technology

The LAVA Clinical Research Management System (CRMS) was developed by the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) to meet the data management needs of a research center with a dynamic and varied set of patient assessment measures and many interrelated research protocols. The system includes a query tool, LAVA Query, which allows principal investigators to create specialized cohorts and generate their own data sets. The system is web-based and can host data for multisite studies.

Data Sharing

As an NIH-sponsored Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) looks for opportunities to share our resources with investigators of the highest caliber. Investigators may request subjects for research studies from the UCSF MAC. Prior to submitting your application, please consult the Data Management & Biostatistics Core leader, Dr.

Biospecimens

As an NIH-sponsored Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) welcomes opportunities to share our resources with investigators of the highest caliber. Investigators may request laboratory and biospecimens from the UCSF MAC. Prior to submitting your application, please consult the Clinical Core leader, Dr.

Cohorts

As an NIH-sponsored Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) looks for opportunities to share our resources with investigators of the highest caliber. Investigators may request subjects for research studies from the UCSF MAC. Prior to submitting your application, please consult the Clinical Core leader, Dr.

Tips for Hospitalization

Hospitalization of a patient with dementia is a potentially stressful experience often associated with negative outcomes for both the patient and family. The “Partner With Me” (PWM) project was developed to educate and connect healthcare providers with family caregivers of our patients with memory impairment.

Hospitalization of a patient with dementia is a potentially stressful experience often associated with negative outcomes for both the patient and family. The majority of dementia care is provided in the home by family caregivers who have intimate knowledge about the patient’s preferences, schedule, communication and comprehension abilities. The "Partner With Me" (PWM) project was developed to educate and connect healthcare providers with family caregivers of our patients with memory impairment.

Eileen Pedersen

Clinical Coordinator

Eileen is a clinical coordinator for the UCSF Memory and Aging Center with a BA degree from Dominican University of California in English.

Alice Hua

Clinical Research Coordinator

Alice graduated from UC Berkeley in 2012 with a BA degree in psychology. While at Cal, she volunteered at the Matthew Walker Sleep & Neuroimaging Lab and Gopnik Cognitive Development Lab, exploring the effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive tasks as well as testing three-year-old's spatial cognition strategies. Alice later joined the Greater Good Science Center where she investigated and published digests on gratitude, mindfulness and empathy. Between classes and lab, she also choreographed hip hop dances, taught free workshops and organized sets to be showcased at the end of each semester.

As a clinical research coordinator to Drs. Bill Seeley and Virginia Sturm, Alice joined the Memory and Aging Center in August 2012 to examine the social and emotional behavior and network organization of patients of neurodegenerative disease.

In her free time, Alice loves exploring the city and hopes to continue pursuing her passion for dance.

Cognitive and Behavioral Control in FTD

The purpose of this study is to learn more about cognitive and behavioral control in frontotemporal dementia. Participants will take paper and computer-based tests measuring motivation and reaction time.

Summary

  • Study director: Joel Kramer, PsyD
  • Sponsor: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Recruiting?: Yes
  • Official study title: Cognitive and Behavioral Control in Frontotemporal Dementia

Kristie Wood

Research Coordinator

Kristie Wood graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in cognitive neuroscience. While studying at UC Berkeley, Kristie volunteered as a research associate in the D’Esposito Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, was president of the Cognitive Science Student Association and co-facilitated a course called “Adventures in Neuroscience.” Post-graduation, Kristie worked as a research associate at the Northern California Institute of Research and Education, developing cognitive training tools for veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Kristie joined the Memory and Aging Center in 2011 and currently coordinates both Cognitive and Behavioral Control in Frontotemporal Dementia as well as Domain Specific Tasks of Executive Function.

In her free time, Kristie likes to write fiction and poetry, meditate, paint and run outside.

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