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Hilary Heuer, PhD

Specialist

Dr. Heuer studies eye movements in aging and neurodegenerative disease as part of Dr. Adam Boxer's laboratory.

Isabel Sible

Clinical Research Coordinator

Isabel Sible graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 2015 with a degree in cognitive science. At Berkeley, she contributed to research on social and emotional changes that can occur in neurodegenerative diseases under the guidance of Dr. Robert Levenson. Additionally, she worked on a project in Dr. Robert Knight’s lab that focused on reconstructing music from intra-cranial recordings of the human brain.

Isabel joined the Memory and Aging Center in May of 2015. She is a clinical research coordinator to Drs. Bill Seeley and Virginia Sturm, examining how neurodegeneration of neural systems gives rise to changes in emotion and social functioning.

Join a Supportive Care Trial

Quality of Life Trials or Supportive Care Trials are research studies to evaluate improving the health, care or quality of life for people, typically without using study drugs or devices. UCSF's Memory and Aging Center (MAC) runs selected supportive trials for people with neurodegenerative disease. Your participation helps us evaluate these interventions. If one of our trials looks interesting to you, please talk with your doctor or contact the study team to see if it is appropriate for you.

Christa Watson, PsyD

Neuropsychology Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Watson graduated from the Pacific Graduate School of Psychology-Stanford PsyD Consortium in 2014. She has a background in psychology, developmental biology, neuroimaging and neuropsychology. Her research interests include brain development across the lifespan. She is currently working on a pediatric HIV brain imaging study with Dr. Victor Valcour.

When she is not working, she enjoys spending time outdoors, watching movies, playing soccer, and listening to jazz. She strongly believes the Golden State Warriors will be the 2015 NBA Champions.

Sarah Dulaney, RN, MS, CNS

Clinical Nurse Specialist

Sarah Dulaney earned a master of science degree in gerontological nursing at UCSF and is certified as a Geriatric Clinical Nurse Specialist by the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

Over the past ten years, Sarah has worked with adults with cognitive impairment in community, long term care and hospital settings. As an AmeriCorps volunteer for L’Arche USA in Portland, Oregon, Sarah lived and worked with adults with developmental disabilities and gained insight into the important role of the family caregiver. As a nursing assistant at Chaparral House in Berkeley, California, Sarah continued to develop her ability to connect with and care for confused patients. As a registered nurse on the stroke unit at Kaiser Hospital in San Francisco, Sarah continues to practice her hands-on skills and offer a supportive presence to patients and families experiencing the devastation of acute brain loss.

Before joining the Care Ecosystem team at the Memory and Aging Center in 2014, Sarah worked as a Dementia Clinical Nurse Specialist and Rural Dementia Care Coordinator for the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. In addition to providing telephone-based care coordination for veterans and their caregivers living in Tuolumne and Calaveras counties, Sarah provided staff training and consultation to help prevent and reduce dementia-related behaviors in the Community Living Centers in Menlo Park, California.

Kathleen Walker

Sleep Study Coordinator

Kathleen graduated from Bates College in 2012 with a degree in neuroscience and a concentration in public health. She joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in August 2014 as part of the sleep research team with Dr. Christine Walsh. The study aims to investigate sleep processes in both healthy older adults and in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases. Kathleen’s experience in clinical sleep research began at the SFVA Medical Center in 2013 where she worked as a research assistant and PSG technician within the Stress and Health Research Program.

Early Onset and Atypical Alzheimer’s Disease

Approximately 5% of patients with Alzheimer’s disease develop symptoms before age 65, without a known genetic cause. In this study, we use comprehensive clinical evaluations, cerebrospinal fluid (optional) and genetic analyses, and MRI and PET imaging to improve our understanding and diagnosis of early onset and atypical Alzheimer’s disease.

Summary

  • Study director: Gil Rabinovici, MD
  • Sponsor: National Institute on Aging
  • Official study title: Early Age-of-Onset AD: Clinical Heterogeneity and Network Degeneration

Tacie Moskowitz

Assistant Clinical Research Coordinator

Tacie grew up in the Philadelphia area and graduated from Wesleyan University in 2013 with a bachelor's degree in cognitive psychology and Science in Society. As an undergraduate, she became interested in the study of memory and participated in episodic memory research that tested the usefulness of SenseCam technology developed by Microsoft Research.

Tacie's love of the outdoors and interest in UCSF's Memory and Aging Center inspired her to move to the Bay Area in August 2014. She is an Assistant Clinical Research Coordinator for the Quest Diagnostics Neurobehavioral Screen.

Mikhail Pakvasa

Clinical Research Coordinator

Mikhail graduated from UC Berkeley in 2014 with a degree in Molecular and Cell Biology. At Berkeley he researched hormonal gene regulation. He joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2015 as a research coordinator for Dr. Marilu Gorno-Tempini, investigating primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and dyslexia.

Averill Cantwell

Clinical Research Coordinator

Averill Cantwell graduated from Harvard University in May 2013 with a concentration in government and secondary field in neurobiology. She joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in May 2014 as a research coordinator for Dr. Gil Rabinovici's study of early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

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