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Carole Scherling, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar

Carole Scherling, PhD, is a postdoctoral student at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. After undergraduate work at the University of Ottawa, she completed a masters degree in neurological sciences at McGill University and a doctorate in behavioral neurosciences at the University of Ottawa. Her past research focused on mild clinical impairments in both healthy and clinical populations using MRI and fMRI techniques, neuropsychological assessments and biological markers. Her current research centers on behavioral and neurophysiological measurements of insight and cognitive abilities in patients with neurodegenerative disease.

Dena Dubal, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Dr. Dubal received her MD and PhD degrees from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Her graduate research with Dr. Phyllis Wise focused on effects of hormones on stroke injury. Dr. Dubal completed a medical internship and neurology residency at UCSF, where she also served as chief resident. She then trained with Drs. Lennart Mucke and Bruce Miller, who shared the 2011 Potamkin Prize in Neurodegeneration. Dr. Dubal is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at UCSF and directs the Laboratory of Neuroscience and Aging research. Her laboratory's research focus is on how to slow or block aging to prevent diseases of the aging brain, such as Alzheimer's. She is a recipient of the Paul Beeson Career Development Award through the NIA and American Federation for Aging Research.

Information on Dr. Dubal's Laboratory for Neuroscience and Aging Research can be accessed at www.duballab.org.

Georges Naasan, MD

Neurologist, Clinical Instructor

Dr. Georges Naasan received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. He completed an internship in medicine and a residency in neurology at Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals of Cleveland. He joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2011 where he is a Clinical Instructor and a Behavioral Neurology Fellow.

As a neurologist, Dr. Naasan evaluates patients and research participants with various neurodegenerative disorders through a multidisciplinary approach and provides follow-up care. He is particularly interested in the psychotic manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases such as hallucinations and delusions. During his residency, he used functional MRI imaging techniques to study the anatomy of misidentification delusions such as the Capgras syndrome.

William Seeley, 2011 MacArthur Fellow

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Alex Beagle

Research Coordinator

Alex graduated from UC Berkeley in 2011 with BA degrees in cognitive science and psychology. During his undergraduate career he volunteered in the Matthew Walker Sleep & Neuroimaging Lab, specializing in EEG and fMRI studies on sleep’s relationship to emotional processing. He also volunteered in UC Berkeley Phonology Lab where he helped investigate phonetically-motivated differences in speech perception. During his time at Cal he also served as a Director’s Assistant in the Cal Band, arranging music for the drumline.

Alex joined the Memory and Aging Center in July 2011 as a research assistant for the Hillblom Aging Network, a longitudinal study of what constitutes normal aging and what early cognitive declines are associated with neurodegenerative disease. He also coordinates Dr. Keith Vossel’s study on the relationship between neurodegenerative diseases and epilepsy.

In his free time during the fall, Alex can be found firmly planted in front of his TV watching college football. During any other season you might find him attending concerts around the bay area, trying out a new restaurant, or taking a trip to somewhere new.

Andrew Trujillo

Research Associate

Andrew joined the Seeley Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory in June 2011 as an Imaging Research Associate. He graduated from Pomona College in 2009 with a bachelor of arts degree in cognitive science. Andrew comes to the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) after having completed a two year apprenticeship at Stanford University where he worked on neuroimaging projects related to reward processing. Andrew assists with fMRI data collection and analysis across multiple projects including the Autonomics study.

Alissa Nana Li, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow

Alissa joined the Seeley Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory in 2011 as a post-doctoral fellow. Her background is in neurodegeneration research. Alissa completed a BSc degree with honors in biomedical science in 2004 and a PhD degree in anatomy in 2009 from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where she investigated the variable pattern of cortical neuronal loss in Huntington’s disease. In the Seeley lab she is investigating the selective vulnerability of von Economo neurons (VENs) in frontotemporal dementia.

Norbert Lee

Staff Research Associate

Norbert Lee joined Dr. Seeley's Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory as a Staff Research Associate in 2010. He assists with brain banking and other histology technician functions.

Shubir Dutt

Imaging Core Associate

Shubir joined the Memory and Aging Center in June of 2011 after receiving his BA degree in cognitive science at UC Berkeley and completing an honors thesis in Dr. Matthew Walker’s Sleep & Neuroimaging Lab. He works with Dr. Joel Kramer on neuroimaging studies of healthy aging through the Hillblom Aging Network and Aging & Cognitive Decline projects. Additionally, he works with Dr. Adam Boxer on neuroimaging analyses of structural and functional data from the Saccade Aging and 4RTNI projects. Shubir is also a leader of the Imaging Core, a small group within the MAC which acquires, tracks, archives, and manages all neuroimaging data acquired at the center and assists all staff with neuroimaging related needs.

Window into the Brain with Adam Boxer, MD, PhD

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Many researchers are finding that by the time a patient seeks treatment for symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, it's often too late for the available drugs to have an effect. Dr. Adam Boxer's lab is studying very precise eye tracking methods to gauge mental fitness and identify cognitive decline decades before the first symptoms appear.

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